Monthly Archives: November 2018

//November

Research Suggests a Cure for Neuroticism

Article Title: Research Suggests a Cure for Neuroticism

Author: Susan Krauss Whitbourne, PhD

Date of Publication: July 11, 2017

“Although personality traits are theoretically unchangeable, as they are thought to be part of the fabric of the individual’s psyche, new research suggests some ways that people high in this quality can feel happier about themselves and their lives.”

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2018-11-30T12:58:56+00:00Categories: All Variations|

Neuroses and neuroticism: What’s the difference?

Article Title: Neuroses and neuroticism: What’s the difference?

Author: Adam Felman

Date of Publication: January 9, 2018

“The word neuroses was originally coined in the 18th century to label a range of psychological disorders that could not usually be linked to a physical cause. It is often confused for neuroticism, a personality trait.”

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2018-11-30T12:48:27+00:00Categories: All Variations|

DNA Hypermethylation and Differential Gene Expression Associated with Klinefelter Syndrome

Article Title: DNA hypermethylation and differential gene expression associated with Klinefelter syndrome

Authors: Anne Skakkebæk, Morten Muhlig Nielsen, Christian Trolle, Søren Vang, Henrik Hornshøj, Jakob Hedegaard, Mikkel Wallentin, Anders Bojesen, Jens Michael Hertz, Jens Fedder, John Rosendahl Østergaard, Jakob Skou Pedersen, and Claus Højbjerg Gravholt

Date of Publication: September 13, 2018

“Recently, a few studies have provided evidence that KS may be associated with widespread changes in the methylome of both blood and brain tissue. These genome-wide alterations in DNA methylation may play a role in the biological mechanisms underlying the clinical KS phenotype by affecting chromatin structure and gene expression and thereby potentially be responsible for the development of phenotypical traits and diseases.
Interestingly, alterations of the trancriptome in blood, brain tissue and testis tissue in KS have also been demonstrated, thereby supporting the hypothesis that sex chromosomes may regulate gene expression throughout the genome.”

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2018-11-20T10:49:30+00:00Categories: 47,XXY (Klinefelter)|

Anxiety and Depression in Klinefelter Syndrome: The Impact of Personality and Social Engagement

Article Title: Anxiety and depression in Klinefelter syndrome: The impact of personality and social engagement

Authors: Anne Skakkebæk, Philip J. Moore, Anders Degn Pedersen, Anders Bojesen, Maria Krarup Kristensen, Jens Fedder, Jens Michael Hertz, John R. Østergaard, Mikkel Wallentin, and Claus Højbjerg Gravholt

Date of Publication: November 9, 2018

“KS patients experienced more anxiety and depression symptoms than control participants. Neuroticism was the strongest and most consistent mediator between KS and both anxiety and depression symptoms. This research suggests that neuroticism may play a central role in attention switching, anxiety and depression among patients with Klinefelter syndrome. The central role of neuroticism suggests that it may be used to help identify and treat KS patients at particularly high-risk for attention-switching deficits, anxiety and depression.”

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2018-11-10T15:08:03+00:00Categories: 47,XXY (Klinefelter)|

Characterization of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Neurodevelopmental Profiles in Youth with XYY Syndrome

Article Title: Characterization of autism spectrum disorder and neurodevelopmental profiles in youth with XYY syndrome

Authors: Lisa Joseph, Cristan Farmer, Colby Chlebowski, Laura Henry, Ari Fish, Catherine Makiw, Anastasia Xenophontos, Liv Clasen, Bethany Saul, Jakob Seidlitz, Jonathan Blumenthal, Erin Torres, Audrey Thurm, and Armin Raznahan

Date of Publication: October 22, 2018

“XYY syndrome is a sex chromosome aneuploidy that occurs in ~ 1/850 male births and is associated with increased risk for neurodevelopmental difficulties. However, the profile of neurodevelopmental impairments, including symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in XYY remains poorly understood. This gap in knowledge has persisted in part due to lack of access to patient cohorts with dense and homogeneous phenotypic data.”

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2018-11-05T21:04:17+00:00Categories: 47,XYY|