Library

Home/Library/

Sex differences in psychiatric disorders: what we can learn from sex chromosome aneuploidies

Article Title: Sex differences in psychiatric disorders: what we can learn from sex chromosome aneuploidies

Authors: Green, Flash, and Reiss

Date of Publication: January 2019

“The study of individuals with sex chromosome aneuploidies provides a promising framework for studying sexual dimorphism in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Here we will review and contrast four syndromes caused by variation in the number of sex chromosomes: Turner syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, XYY syndrome, and XXX syndrome. Overall we describe an increased rate of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder, along with the increased rates of major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders in one or more of these conditions. In addition to contributing unique insights about sexual dimorphism in neuropsychiatric disorders, awareness of the increased risk of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders in sex chromosome aneuploidies can inform appropriate management of these common genetic disorders.”

Read more

Neuropsychological functions, sleep, and mental health in adults with Klinefelter syndrome

Article Title: Neuropsychological functions, sleep, and mental health in adults with Klinefelter syndrome

Authors: Fjermestad, Huster,  Thunberg, Stokke, Gravholt, and Solbakk

Date of Publication: April 29, 2020

“Altogether, men with KS display problems in neuropsychological functions and mental health but do not appear different from controls on most sleep parameters. Our findings indicate that relations between neuropsychological functions, sleep, and mental health differ between men with KS and controls.”

Read more

2020-05-25T14:56:13-04:00Categories: 47,XXY (Klinefelter)|Tags: |

The Association of Motor Skills & Adaptive Functioning in XXY/Klinefelter & XXYY Syndromes

Article Title: The Association of Motor Skills and Adaptive Functioning in XXY/Klinefelter and XXYY Syndromes

Authors: Tartaglia, Davis, Martin, Cordeiro, and Richardson

Date of Publication: December 28, 2018

“Both conditions have been previously associated with motor delays and motor skills deficits. We aimed to describe and compare motor skills in males with XXY and XXYY syndromes, and to analyze associations with age, cognitive abilities, and adaptive functioning.”

Read more

2020-04-21T15:12:53-04:00Categories: 47,XXY (Klinefelter), 48,XXYY|

The Lived Experience of Klinefelter Syndrome: A Narrative Review of the Literature (Psychosocial and Quality of Life Impact)

Article Title: The Lived Experience of Klinefelter Syndrome: A Narrative Review of the Literature

Authors: Hanna, Cheetham, Fearon, Herbrand, Hudson, McEleny, Quinton, Stevenson, and Wilkes

Date of Publication: November 26, 2019

“This review examines the existing psychosocial evidence around the impact of KS, exploring what we know about KS and its relevance for health care for this group.”

Read more

2020-02-18T11:01:00-05:00Categories: 47,XXY (Klinefelter)|Tags: |

Sperm retrieval rates in non-mosaic Klinefelter patients undergoing testicular sperm extraction

Article Title: Sperm retrieval rates in non-mosaic Klinefelter patients undergoing testicular sperm extraction: what expectations do we have in the real-life setting?

Authors: Boeri et al

Date of Publication: January 30, 2020

“A recent meta-analysis (Corona et al, 2017) reported positive sperm retrieval rates (SRR) in 50% of patients with Klinefelter syndrome (KS) undergoing testicular sperm extraction (TESE). However, these results do not reflect the rates of SR that we observe in clinical practice. We assessed the rate and potential predictors of SR in Klinefelter patients in the real-life setting.”

Read more

2020-02-17T21:18:40-05:00Categories: 47,XXY (Klinefelter)|

Sperm recovery and ICSI outcomes in men with non-obstructive azoospermia

Article Title: Sperm recovery and ICSI outcomes in men with non-obstructive azoospermia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Authors: Corona et al

Date of Publication: October 30, 2019

“This analysis shows that cTESE/mTESE in subjects with NOA results in SRRs of up to 50%, with no differences when cTESE was compared to mTESE. Retrieved sperms resulted in a LBR of up to 28% ICSI cycle. Although no difference between techniques was found, to conclusively clarify if one technique is superior to the other, there is a need for a sufficiently powered and well-designed randomized controlled trial to compare mTESE to cTESE in men with NOA.”

Read more

2020-02-17T21:17:57-05:00Categories: 47,XXY (Klinefelter)|
Load More Posts