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AXYS - The Association for X&Y Chromosome Variations
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Supporting students with sex chromosome aneuploidies in educational settings

Article Title: Supporting students with sex chromosome aneuploidies in educational settings: Results of a nationwide survey

Authors: Thompson, Davis, Janusz, Frith, Pylead, Howell, Boada, Wilson, and Tartaglia

Date of Publication: August 2022

“Many parents reported their children’s educators had little to no knowledge of SCA conditions, justifying a need to train teachers and policy makers in the unique educational needs of children and adolescents with SCAs. School psychologists should be aware of the frequent need for accommodations and individualized support plans in this population so they can support children and families by advocating for early and comprehensive evaluations and intervention plans.”

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Early Social Behavior in Young Children with Sex Chromosome Trisomies (Trisomy X, XXY, XYY)

Article Title: Early Social Behavior in Young Children with Sex Chromosome Trisomies (XXX, XXY, XYY): Profiles of Observed Social Interactions and Social Impairments Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Authors: Bouw, Swaab, Tartaglia, Cordeiro, and van Rijn

Date of Publication: March 23, 2022

“Individuals with Sex Chromosome Trisomies (SCT; XXX, XXY, XYY) have an increased vulnerability for developing challenges in social adaptive functioning. The present study investigates social interaction behavior in the context of varying social load, and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) symptomatology in young children aged 1–7.5 years old, with SCT (N = 105) and control children (N = 101). Children with SCT show less interaction behaviors and more social withdrawal, as compared to their control peers, which were most evident in the high social load condition. Second, social impairments related to ASD are more prevalent, as compared to controls (27.1% at clinical level). These findings stress the importance of early monitoring and (preventive) support of early social development in young children with SCT.”

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‘I Wish the School Had a Better Understanding of the Diagnosis’: parent perspectives on educational needs of students with SCAs

Article Title: ‘I Wish the School Had a Better Understanding of the Diagnosis’: parent perspectives on educational needs of students with sex chromosome aneuploidies

Authors: Thompson, Stinnett, Tartaglia, Davis, and Janusz

Date of Publication: March 13, 2022

“Students with SCAs, have a unique educational profile that may be challenging to support within the schools. Challenges with reading and writing, EF, fatigue/endurance, social skills and emotion management may act as barriers to learning, and are frequently triggered in busy classroom environments. Skills hovering in the borderline range are common to the SCA phenotype and are not often well served by special education systems with limited resources and strict cut-offs for qualification. As a result, families may feel they need to advocate strongly for their child to receive adequate support services. To improve the educational experience of children with SCAs, we recommend increased collaboration between the school and the child’s medical team, strong parent partnerships and acknowledgement of the significant role the genetic condition plays in the educational experiences of students with SCAs.”

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Early Preventive Intervention for Young Children With Sex Chromosome Trisomies (XXX, XXY, XYY)

Article Title: Early Preventive Intervention for Young Children With Sex Chromosome Trisomies (XXX, XXY, XYY): Supporting Social Cognitive Development Using a Neurocognitive Training Program Targeting Facial Emotion Understanding

Authors: Bouw, Swaab, and van Rijn

Date of Publication: February 25, 2022

“The significant improvement in facial emotion recognition, with large effect sizes, suggests that there are opportunities for positively supporting the development of social cognition in children with an extra X- or Y-chromosome, already at a very young age. This evidence based support is of great importance given the need for preventive and early training programs in children with SCT, aimed to minimize neurodevelopmental impact.”

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2022-03-03T11:28:23-05:00Categories: 47,XXX (trisomy x), 47,XXY (Klinefelter), 47,XYY|Tags: |

Early developmental impact of sex chromosome trisomies on ADHD symptomology in young children

Article Title: Early developmental impact of sex chromosome trisomies on attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder symptomology in young children

Authors: Kuiper, Swaab, Tartaglia, and van Rijn

Date of Publication: June 18, 2021

“Individuals with sex chromosome trisomies ([SCT], XXX, XXY, and XYY)) are at increased risk for neurodevelopmental problems, given that a significant portion of the sex chromosome genes impact brain functioning. An elevated risk for psychopathology has also been described, including attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The present study aimed at identifying early markers of ADHD, providing the first investigation of ADHD symptomology in very young children with SCT.”

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2022-02-25T13:15:20-05:00Categories: 47,XXX (trisomy x), 47,XXY (Klinefelter), 47,XYY|Tags: |

Congenital heart defects associated with aneuploidy syndromes

Article Title: Congenital heart defects associated with aneuploidy syndromes: New insights into familiar associations

Authors: Lin, Santoro, High, Goldenberg, and Gutmark-Little

Date of Publication: November 7, 2019

“The frequent occurrence of congenital heart defects (CHDs) in chromosome abnormality syndromes is well-known, and among aneuploidy syndromes, distinctive patterns have been delineated. We update the type and frequency of CHDs in the aneuploidy syndromes involving trisomy 13, 18, 21, and 22, and in several sex chromosome abnormalities (Turner syndrome, trisomy X, Klinefelter syndrome, 47,XYY, and 48,XXYY).We also discuss the impact of noninvasive prenatal screening (mainly, cell-free DNA analysis), critical CHD screening, and the growth of parental advocacy on their surgical management and natural history. We encourage clinicians to view the cardiac diagnosis as a ‘phenotype’ which supplements the external dysmorphology examination. When detected prenatally, severe CHDs may influence decision-making, and postnatally, they are often the major determinants of survival. This review should be useful to geneticists, cardiologists, neonatologists, perinatal specialists, other pediatric specialists, and general pediatricians. As patients survive (and thrive) into adulthood, internists and related adult specialists will also need to be informed about their natural history and management.”

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The Need for Greater Awareness of Sex Chromosome Variations

Article Title: The Need for Greater Awareness of Sex Chromosome Variations

Author: Erin Torres, MSN, PMHNP-BC, RN-BC

Date of Publication: September 2021

From the article’s abstract: “Health care providers remain ill prepared to recognize these conditions and support patients and their families.”

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Epigenetic and transcriptomic consequences of excess X-chromosome material in 47,XXX syndrome

Article Title: Epigenetic and transcriptomic consequences of excess X-chromosome material in 47,XXX syndrome—A comparison with Turner syndrome and 46,XX females

Authors: Nielsen, Trolle, Vang, Hornshøj, Skakkebaek, Hedegaard, Nordentoft, Pedersen, and Gravholt

Date of Publication: June 3, 2020

“In conclusion, our results suggest an impact of the supernumerary X chromosome in 47,XXX syndrome on the methylation status of selected genes despite an overall comparable expression profile.”

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2021-03-03T14:50:48-05:00Categories: 47,XXX (trisomy x)|

What microRNAs could tell us about the human X chromosome

Article Title: What microRNAs could tell us about the human X chromosome

Authors: Di Palo, Siniscalchi, Salerno, Russo, Gravholt and Potenza

Date of Publication: April 30, 2020

“MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small-non coding RNAs endowed with great regulatory power, thus playing key roles not only in almost all physiological pathways, but also in the pathogenesis of several diseases. Surprisingly, genomic distribution analysis revealed the highest density of miRNA sequences on the X chromosome; this evolutionary conserved mammalian feature equips females with a larger miRNA machinery than males. However, miRNAs contribution to some X-related conditions, properties or functions is still poorly explored. With the aim to support and focus research in the field, this review analyzes the literature and databases about X-linked miRNAs, trying to understand how miRNAs could contribute to emerging gender-biased functions and pathological mechanisms, such as immunity and cancer. A fine map of miRNA sequences on the X chromosome is reported, and their known functions are discussed; in addition, bioinformatics functional analyses of the whole X-linked miRNA targetome (predicted and validated) were performed. The emerging scenario points to different gaps in the knowledge that should be filled with future experimental investigations, also in terms of possible implications and pathological perspectives for X chromosome aneuploidy syndromes, such as Turner and Klinefelter syndromes.”

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Social functioning and emotion recognition in adults with triple X syndrome (TXS)

Article Title: Social functioning and emotion recognition in adults with triple X syndrome

Authors: Otter, Crins, Campforts, Stumpel, Van Amelsvoort, and Vingerhoets

Publication Date: February 15, 2021

“Our findings indicate that adults with TXS have a higher prevalence of impaired social functioning and emotion recognition. These results highlight the relevance of sex chromosome aneuploidy as a potential model for studying disorders characterised by social impairments such as autism spectrum disorder, particularly among women.”

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2021-02-23T13:49:23-05:00Categories: 47,XXX (trisomy x)|
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