Epigenetic and transcriptomic consequences of excess X-chromosome material in 47,XXX syndrome

Article Title: Epigenetic and transcriptomic consequences of excess X-chromosome material in 47,XXX syndrome—A comparison with Turner syndrome and 46,XX females

Authors: Nielsen, Trolle, Vang, Hornshøj, Skakkebaek, Hedegaard, Nordentoft, Pedersen, and Gravholt

Date of Publication: June 3, 2020

“In conclusion, our results suggest an impact of the supernumerary X chromosome in 47,XXX syndrome on the methylation status of selected genes despite an overall comparable expression profile.”

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2021-03-03T14:50:48-05:00Categories: 47,XXX (trisomy x)|

What microRNAs could tell us about the human X chromosome

Article Title: What microRNAs could tell us about the human X chromosome

Authors: Di Palo, Siniscalchi, Salerno, Russo, Gravholt and Potenza

Date of Publication: April 30, 2020

“MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small-non coding RNAs endowed with great regulatory power, thus playing key roles not only in almost all physiological pathways, but also in the pathogenesis of several diseases. Surprisingly, genomic distribution analysis revealed the highest density of miRNA sequences on the X chromosome; this evolutionary conserved mammalian feature equips females with a larger miRNA machinery than males. However, miRNAs contribution to some X-related conditions, properties or functions is still poorly explored. With the aim to support and focus research in the field, this review analyzes the literature and databases about X-linked miRNAs, trying to understand how miRNAs could contribute to emerging gender-biased functions and pathological mechanisms, such as immunity and cancer. A fine map of miRNA sequences on the X chromosome is reported, and their known functions are discussed; in addition, bioinformatics functional analyses of the whole X-linked miRNA targetome (predicted and validated) were performed. The emerging scenario points to different gaps in the knowledge that should be filled with future experimental investigations, also in terms of possible implications and pathological perspectives for X chromosome aneuploidy syndromes, such as Turner and Klinefelter syndromes.”

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Social functioning and emotion recognition in adults with triple X syndrome (TXS)

Article Title: Social functioning and emotion recognition in adults with triple X syndrome

Authors: Otter, Crins, Campforts, Stumpel, Van Amelsvoort, and Vingerhoets

Publication Date: February 15, 2021

“Our findings indicate that adults with TXS have a higher prevalence of impaired social functioning and emotion recognition. These results highlight the relevance of sex chromosome aneuploidy as a potential model for studying disorders characterised by social impairments such as autism spectrum disorder, particularly among women.”

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2021-02-23T13:49:23-05:00Categories: 47,XXX (trisomy x)|

A review of neurocognitive functioning of children with sex chromosome trisomies

Article Title: A review of neurocognitive functioning of children with sex chromosome trisomies: Identifying targets for early intervention

Authors: Van Rijn, Urbanus, and Swaab

Date of Publication: July 2, 2019

“Results of the reviewed studies show that although traditionally, the focus has been on language and intelligence (IQ) in this population, recent studies suggest that executive functioning and social cognition may also be significantly affected already in childhood. These findings suggest that neuropsychological screening of children diagnosed with SCT should be extended, to also include executive functioning and social cognition. Knowledge about these neurocognitive risks is important to improve clinical care and help identify targets for early support and intervention programs to accommodate for the needs of individuals with SCT.”

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2021-01-13T13:26:28-05:00Categories: 47,XXX (trisomy x), 47,XXY (Klinefelter), 47,XYY|Tags: |

The behavioral profile of children aged 1–5 years with sex chromosome trisomy

Article Title: The behavioral profile of children aged 1–5 years with sex chromosome trisomy (47,XXX, 47,XXY, 47,XYY)

Authors: Van Rijn, Tartaglia, Urbanus, Swaab, and Cordeiro

Date of Publication: May 20, 2020

“Collectively, these results demonstrate the importance of behavioral screening for behavioral problems in routine clinical care for children with SCT from a young age. Social–emotional problems may require special attention, as these problems seem most prominent, showing increased risk across the full age range, and with these problems occurring regardless of the timing of diagnosis, and across all three SCT karyotypes.”

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2021-01-07T16:31:23-05:00Categories: 47,XXX (trisomy x), 47,XXY (Klinefelter), 47,XYY|

ACRC Accomplishments

In 2015, the AXYS Board of Directors voted to approve the development of the AXYS Clinical and Research Consortium (ACRC). The two goals that AXYS defined at that time were to improve the availability and the quality of services to the X&Y variation community. As the ACRC grew, the original goals were refined to be as follows:

  • Make life easier for those seeking evaluation and treatment.
  • Bring consistency to treatment that is consensus and/or evidence-based.
  • Advance the overall X&Y variation field through coordinated efforts including research.
  • Bring clinical excellence to the field of X&Y variations.

Though each clinic operates independently, as members of a consortium, they collaborate with one another, share informational resources, and have the opportunity to participate in joint research projects.

In addition, AXYS organizes annual meetings of the consortium at which members meet to discuss topics important to the X&Y chromosome variation community. AXYS works to ensure that all families impacted by any of the chromosome variations have access to the best available evaluation and treatment or treatment recommendations.

Timeline of the ACRC

(Click on the year to see the accomplishments for that year.)

AXYS brought on Robby Miller as an experienced consultant to assist AXYS in creating the ACRC. 

First meeting of ACRC 2015

First meeting of ACRC 2015

The formation committee, Dr. Tartaglia and Susan Howell of the eXtraordinarY Kids Clinic in Colorado, Jim Moore the AXYS Executive Director and Robby met. The consortium was formed.

First ACRC meeting held in Denver.

AXYS Clinical Needs and Desires survey, supported by AXYS, Emory University and PCORI began.

AXYS Clinical Needs and Desires survey concluded. Results presented to ACRC by lead investigator Dr. Sharron Close.

Launched with 8 founding clinics: Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Denver, Los Angles, New York, Stanford, Wilmington

ACRC meets in Denver

Discussed need for Adult clinics

Added clinic in Wake-Forest

ACRC meets in Chicago

Began Consensus Documents

Added clinic in Philadelphia

ACRC meets in Atlanta

Conducted study to pilot a process to form clinics for adults, funded by the WITH Foundation Grant. Study led by Sharron Close at Emory University and Susan Howell at Colorado Children’s Hospital.

2019 CME Grant Team

AXYS awarded grant from the Kosloski Family Foundation to create CME course on Klinefelter Syndrome in Adults

Added clinics in Boston and Cleveland

Photo of 2019 ACRC meeting

Photo of 2019 ACRC meeting

First virtual ACRC meeting

Held quarterly ACRC meetings with dedicated discussions on telehealth, Families of Color and Adult clinics.

Added clinic in New York, second clinic in Philadelphia for adults

Added first international clinics in Vancouver, Canada and Århus, Denmark.

Expanded ACRC to include clinical researchers:

  • Megan A. Allyse, PhD. Mayo Clinic, United States
  • Christine Disteche, PhD, University of Washington, United States
  • Claus Gravholt, MD, PhD, Aarhus University Hospital, Århus, Denmark
  • Armin Raznahan MD, PhD, National Institutes of Health, United States
  • Sophie van Rijn, PhD, Leiden University, The Netherlands

Published first Consensus Documents

Added international clinic in London, UK.

The Expert in the Room

Article Title: The Expert in the Room: Parental Advocacy for Children with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies

Authors: Richardson, Riggan, and Allyse

Date of Publication: November 2, 2020

“Owing to fragmentation in the medical system, many parents of children with disabilities report taking on a care coordinator and advocate role. The parental advocacy and care coordination requirements are further amplified in this population because of a lack of awareness about sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) in medical and social services settings, as well as the complex needs of affected children. This burden disproportionately affects mothers and low-resource families as a result of gendered ideas of parenthood and social stratification in resource access. The aim of this study is to understand the unique parental burdens of SCAs and family support needs.”

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Diminished Ovarian Reserve in Girls and Adolescents with Trisomy X Syndrome

Article Title: Diminished Ovarian Reserve in Girls and Adolescents with Trisomy X Syndrome

Authors: Davis, Soares, Howell, Cree-Green, Buyers, Johnson, and Tartaglia

Date of Publication: June 2020

“An extra X chromosome occurs in ~ 1 in 1000 females, resulting in a karyotype 47,XXX also known as trisomy X syndrome (TXS). Women with TXS appear to be at increased risk for premature ovarian insufficiency; however, very little research on this relationship has been conducted. The objective of this case-control study is to compare ovarian function, as measured by anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) levels, between girls with TXS and controls. Serum AMH concentrations were compared between 15 females with TXS (median age 13.4 years) and 26 controls (median age 15.1 years). Females with TXS had significantly lower serum AMH compared to controls (0.7 ng/mL (IQR 0.2–1.7) vs 2.7 (IQR 1.3–4.8), p < 0.001). Additionally, girls with TXS were much more likely to have an AMH below the 2.5th percentile for age with 67% of them meeting these criteria (OR 11, 95% CI 2.3–42). Lower AMH concentrations in females with TXS may represent an increased risk for primary ovarian insufficiency in these patients and potentially a narrow window of opportunity to pursue fertility preservation options. Additional research is needed to understand the natural history of low AMH concentrations and future risk of premature ovarian insufficiency in girls with TXS.”

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2021-01-15T14:37:59-05:00Categories: 47,XXX (trisomy x)|

The epidemiology of sex chromosome abnormalities

Article Title: The epidemiology of sex chromosome abnormalities

Authors: Berglund, Stochholm, and Gravholt

Date of Publication: May 11, 2020

“Sex chromosome abnormalities (SCAs) are characterized by gain or loss of entire sex chromosomes or parts of sex chromosomes with the best-known syndromes being Turner syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, 47,XXX syndrome, and 47,XYY syndrome. Since these syndromes were first described more than 60 years ago, several papers have reported on diseases and health related problems, neurocognitive deficits, and social challenges among affected persons. However, the generally increased comorbidity burden with specific comorbidity patterns within and across syndromes as well as early death of affected persons was not recognized until the last couple of decades, where population-based epidemiological studies were undertaken. Moreover, these epidemiological studies provided knowledge of an association between SCAs and a negatively reduced socioeconomic status in terms of education, income, retirement, cohabitation with a partner and parenthood. This review is on the aspects of epidemiology in Turner, Klinefelter, 47,XXX and 47,XYY syndrome.”

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2020-06-16T17:22:47-04:00Categories: 47,XXX (trisomy x), 47,XXY (Klinefelter), 47,XYY|

Early neurodevelopmental and medical profile in children with sex chromosome trisomies

Article Title: Early neurodevelopmental and medical profile in children with sex chromosome trisomies: Background for the prospective eXtraordinarY babies study to identify early risk factors and targets for intervention

Authors: Tartaglia, Howell, Davis, Kowal, Tanda, Brown, Boada, Alston, Crawford, Thompson, Van Rijn, Wilson, Janusz, and Ross

Date of Publication: May 13, 2020

“This study aims to better describe and compare the natural history of SCT conditions, identify predictors of positive and negative outcomes in SCT, evaluate developmental and autism screening measures commonly used in primary care practices for the SCT population, and build a rich data set linked to a bank of biological samples for future study. Results from this study and ongoing international research efforts will inform evidence-based care and improve health and neurodevelopmental outcomes.”

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2020-06-16T17:00:13-04:00Categories: 47,XXX (trisomy x), 47,XXY (Klinefelter), 47,XYY|
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