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Emory University’s Amy Blumling: “Learning about things larger than you”

Article Title: Learning about thing larger than you

Author: Pam Auchmutey (Emory University, Nursing Magazine)

Date of Publication: Fall 2019

“As a School of Nursing doctoral student, Amy Blumling provides much-needed care to a special patient population at Emory Healthcare. Twice monthly, she and other providers see patients at the eXtraordinarY Clinic, the Southeast’s only clinic for children with sex chromosome disorders.”

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2020-01-14T10:10:32-05:00Categories: 48,XXYY, All Variations|

Cardiac Functioning and Blood Pressure of 47,XYY and 47,XXY Men

Article Title: Cardiac Functioning and Blood Pressure of 47,XYY and 47,XXY Men in a Double-Blind, Double-Matched Population Survey

Authors: Erik Boison, David R. Owen, Lejf Rasmussen, and Joseph Sergeant

Date of Publication: 1981

“This paper reports the electrocardiogram measures and blood pressure of 12 men with 47,XYY, 14 men with 47,XXY, and 52 matched controls with 46,XY. The abnormal karyotypes were identified in a systematic population search for XYY and XXY men. The subjects and their matched controls were examined in a double-blind fashion. Electrocardiogram measures of 47,XYY and 47,XXY men were found to differ from those of 46,XY controls. The XYYs had longer P-R intervals, shorter QRS complexes, and nonsignificantly longer R-R intervals than their matched controls. The XXYs showed longer R-R intervals and trends for prolonged P-R intervals and shorter QRS complexes when compared with their controls. Trends toward increased within-group variability in the XYY and XXY groups were observed in five of six variance tests, suggesting that the sex chromosome aneuploids have a cardiac conduction anomaly. Blood pressure measures of 47,XYY and 47,XXY men were found not to differ from those of 46,XY men. None of the measures revealed a significant difference between the XYYs and the XXYs.”

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2019-12-10T15:12:59-05:00Categories: 47,XXY (Klinefelter), 47,XYY|

Changes in the cohort composition of TS, severe non-diagnosis of KS, 47,XXX and 47,XYY syndrome

Article Title: Changes in the cohort composition of Turner syndrome and severe non-diagnosis of Klinefelter, 47,XXX and 47,XYY syndrome: a nationwide cohort study

Authors: Claus H. Gravholt, MD, PhD et al

Date of Publication: January 14, 2019

“The prevalence of TS is higher than previously identified, and the karyotypic composition of the TS population is changing. Non-diagnosis is extensive among KS, Triple X and Double Y, whereas all TS seem to become diagnosed. The diagnostic activity has increased among TS with other karyotypes than 45,X as well as among KS and Double Y.”

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Testosterone treatment and association with thrombin generation and coagulation inhibition in KS

Article Title: Testosterone treatment and association with thrombin generation and coagulation inhibition in Klinefelter syndrome: A cross-sectional study

Authors: Claus H. Gravholt, MD, PhD et al

Date of Publication: August 19, 2019

“In this cross-sectional study thrombin generation in men with KS was inversely associated with testosterone and androgen action. T-KS [testosterone treated Klinefelter syndrome] expressed a less pro-coagulant thrombin generation profile compared with U-KS [untreated Klinefelter syndrome]. Whether testosterone treatment in KS affects thrombosis risk in KS needs to be evaluated from longitudinal studies.”

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2019-10-30T14:46:22-04:00Categories: 47,XXY (Klinefelter)|

A placebo-controlled randomized study with testosterone in Klinefelter Syndrome

Article Title: A placebo-controlled randomized study with testosterone in Klinefelter syndrome: beneficial effects on body composition

Authors: Claus H. Gravholt, MD, PhD et al

Date of Publication: August 7, 2019

“Testosterone treatment in adult males with KS for 6 months leads to favorable changes in body composition with reductions in fat mass, including abdominal fat mass, but does not change measures of glucose homeostasis.”

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2019-10-30T14:12:43-04:00Categories: 47,XXY (Klinefelter)|

Emotion regulation in adults with Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY)

Article Title: Emotion regulation in adults with Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY): Neurocognitive underpinnings and associations with mental health problems

Authors: Sophie van Rijn and Hanna Swaab

Date of Publication: October 8, 2019

This paper is from ACRC member and AXYS Family Conference presenter Dr. Sophie van Rijn. While only 26 men participated in this study and the results are from a self-reported questionnaire, this paper shines a light on issues commonly faced by adults with 47,XXY.

The aim of this study was to evaluate if language and executive functioning deficits in individuals with 47,XXY contribute to emotion regulation problems. Results: Atypical emotion regulation strategies were found in the XXY group, with increased expression of emotions (69%), avoiding (65%), distraction seeking (54%), and passive coping (54%). More difficulties in mental flexibility and attention regulation, and speeded responding were associated with more pronounced emotion expression (emotional outbursts). Emotion regulation problems were associated with symptoms of anxiety, depression, thought problems, and hostility.

Conclusion: This study has identified emotion regulation as a potential target for treatment and intervention, with a specific focus on executive functions in the management of emotions in individuals with 47,XXY.

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2019-10-10T16:02:50-04:00Categories: 47,XXY (Klinefelter)|

Tina Hanif’s Story

When I got the in utero diagnosis of my son’s XXY in 1995, I had feelings of despair, confusion, frustration, and sadness. My husband and I went to the public library in Manhattan to explore KS information, per the geneticist’s recommendation. We were traumatized by the photographs and misinformation.

Dr. Adler, my OB/GYN was very consoling and empathetic. He gave me Melissa Aylstock’s information and told me she was fighting for her son and other KS kids through KS & Associates, the organization she founded.

Melissa was sweet, kind, concerned and very responsive to my plea for help!  Back then it was ‘long distance’ phone calls to California from NJ. We were on the phone for hours. Melissa sent me an overnight package with photographs of her son, whom she had self-diagnosed, along with photos of other KS guys. They looked NOTHING even close to the pictures we had seen at the library. In fact, they were handsome guys with no physical signs of anything unusual.

I had the good fortune of meeting Melissa and her son at the 1995 KS&A conference. A couple dozen people attended that event. I witnessed the growth of AXYS, (KS&A was renamed AXYS in 2014) when I attended the 2019 conference with nearly 400 participants: medical professionals, parents, and individuals with X and Y variations, who traveled from all over the US, South America and even Europe to attend. Attending the conference was not only nostalgic for me as I reflected back on 1995, but also a sign of hope that awareness, support and education are on the rise.

I raised my son alone, well, along with a few good nannies and sitters. My son is a smart, handsome, caring, kind, person with drive and passion.  As my son struggles with KS related neurocognitive issues, I continue to look for answers while guiding him along the way to independence.

My involvement with AXYS is driven by not only my need to help others, but a moral obligation to do like Melissa did: sincerely give back to others, to give hope to parents not sure of the outcome, listen and empathize with families, provide references or referrals when needed and most of all, to help spread awareness, support and education about X and Y variations.

Tina Hanif
Leader of the Florida Support Group

2019-08-29T13:03:36-04:00Categories: 47,XXY (Klinefelter), All Variations|Tags: |

Laurie Milton’s Story

Due to speech and language delays my son started in special education preschool. When my son entered kindergarten, his teacher saw similarities between Kent and another boy who was diagnosed with XXXXY. We took her advice and got genetic testing for our son.

We learned back in 1994 that our son did not just have one extra X as we suspected but has an extra X and an extra Y; he has XXYY.

Our doctors suggested we not read the older literature that painted a horrid picture for our son but instead told us to contact KS&A and join the support group. As it turned out, Melissa Alystock lived less than a mile from us. Our kids attended the same schools.

Melissa Alystock started holding conferences to gather people with X and Y variations together. She sought and received grants from pharmaceutical companies to support these events. In addition, she gained the professional support and services of health care professionals who met with families at these events. It was life changing for many to meet with a doctor, genetic counselor or other professional that was knowledgeable about X and Y conditions.

Melissa and her husband needed help managing this fast growing organization so she asked me to join the board and then I served as a moderator for the listserv. I saw the challenges trying to meet the needs of grown men with X and Y variations as well as simultaneously meeting the needs of parents of younger children without overwhelming them. There is only so much many of us can process at once, so some families step back from support groups but then later rejoin either when they need assistance or when they are in a position to offer it.

I financially support AXYS (The XXYY Project) and encourage my family to do so also. This assures there is help, information and research for all when it is needed.

2019-08-30T16:17:34-04:00Categories: 48,XXYY, All Variations|Tags: |

AXYS Executive Director Visits Michigan

My favorite part of serving AXYS as your Executive Director is getting to know our community. In mid August I was in Michigan visiting my family and had the pleasure to meet 7 families in our community.

Jennifer, a Mom of a 2-year-old with XXXY and I were hosted by Elisha, a mom of a 2-year-old with Trisomy X. Elisha lives in the city where I grew up. Both Moms shared the wish that the support groups shared more triumphs and positive stories as well as answering questions when problems arose. With a toddler, you have so much ahead of you, so the hope the positive stories offer are greatly needed. So everyone reading this, please keep sharing positive photos and stories in our support groups.

That evening, I had dinner with Jaime and Jeff and their daughter. They are the parents of a teen with XXY, who would have come with his family but had a much more fun offer from his friends. Jaime has attended a few conferences, including our the 2019 AXYS Family Conference in Atlanta. She shared her thoughts on the conference, including the desire for more teen activities and more sibling activities.

The following evening I met with Kathy, who also attended the conference.  Our conversation focused on her adult son with XXY, and the work it takes to get SSI. I shared the relevant videos from our YouTube Channel. Kathy gave me candy from Bay City’s most famous candy store St. Laurent Brothers, where Madonna stops to get candy when she is in the area.

On Friday, Wendy and her son John, a 30-year-old with XXY, drove 75 miles to meet me, and Dan and Sonya who have a son with XXY. Wendy offered to share brochures with doctors in Grand Rapids. Thank you Wendy!!

I met Nancy who has a 30-year-old son with XXYY and Brandy and her son 15-year-old XXY son at Ray’s Ice Cream. I used to go there as a child and I had a Boston Cooler, a drink only those from the Detroit area will know.

Kevin and Joy—thanks for reaching out and I hope we can connect the next time I get to Michigan.

Cami—I hope we can meet the next time I’m in Bay City.

2019-08-26T13:21:49-04:00Categories: All Variations|
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